How to Get a Criminal Justice Scholarship

How to find Criminal Justice Scholarships?

Criminal justice is a broad field, encompassing many areas, from law and crime scene investigation to law enforcement and criminology. With a degree in criminal justice you will have many choices in front of you, many jobs and careers to consider. But education can be costly, we all know that. One way to mitigate this problem is to look into student loans as well as scholarships.

Criminal justice degree programs at various schools have their own bands of scholarships. Scholarships can be based on merit, exceptional scholarly achievement or outstanding financial need. Aside from particular schools, the American Criminal Justice Associations funds annual scholarships for students pursuing a degree in criminal justice.

If you are serious about a criminal justice degree, take the time to research scholarships available to you. Check with the school you plan to attend first. Contact the financial aid office and request materials regarding available scholarships. Aside from scholarships directly related to students in criminal justice, consider investigating general scholarships not intent for a particular major.

Examples of Criminal Justice Scholarships

1. Straightforward Media Law Enforcement Scholarship
2. Correctional Association of Massachusetts Scholarship
3. Monster Scholarship for Government and Public Service

Steps for Criminal Justice and General Scholarships Search

Step 1: Learn to surf

There is so much information about grants, scholarships, awards and aid out there – use it to your advantage. Look everywhere, from your parent’s employers, civic clubs, professional associations in you’re filed of interest to websites of your colleges of choice. Call the Federal Student Aid Information Center (1-800-433-3243). Public libraries and bookstores have books that list scholarships, grants and awards. By utilizing all the free information that is out there on the internet you can find an impressive list of awards, grants, loans and scholarships to apply to.

Step 2: Get organized

There are so many scholarships and award out there; it is very hard to keep up to date and on top of all of them. To achieve this, make a calendar of scholarship/award applications and deadlines. Make copies of what you have already submitted and crate a pile of applications you still need to submit. This will ensure you don’t miss any deadlines and you don’t apply to the same program more then once. Streamline your work and start organizing.

Step 3: Start early

A large number of financial aid is offered on first- come, first- serve basis. Obtain your forms well ahead of the deadline time, fill them out and then be the first one to submit your application on the first day available. Having a calendar (step 2) will allow you to have all the deadlines at a glance. Plan out your application process carefully.

Step 4: Talk to your scholarship counselor

Utilize your scholarship counselor as they have much experience in this area. Your counselor will also have a running list of any new scholarships and awards that come out so check with your Guidance office often. You can have your guidance counselor assist you in your search for financial aid, help you in the application process and serve as a reference.

How Copyright Laws Fail Us When We Need Them Most

I used to worry about other people stealing my work. I do lots of different kinds of things so there is plenty to steal. In 35 years of being in business, I have produced plenty of exceptional photos, illustrations, graphic design, ads, websites, printed collateral material, logos, music and writing, to name just a few. And of course, I also have plenty of clients for all my competition to try to steal away from me as well. This is normal. If you are talented in any way, or in business of any kind, people steal from you.

What about copyright laws? Unless you want to waste lots of money hiring a lawyer to chase after every thief and take them to court only to get a judgement against them which they probably will never pay, what is the use? And that’s if you’re lucky. Most of the time in cases of Internet violation, you can never even locate the person responsible, let alone convict him of the crime. But it’s not money I’m after. If I were, why in heaven’s name would I be writing articles for Internet article directories who don’t pay for use of their articles? I write for such sites to get the benefit of linkbacks for my website and blog. What are linkbacks? They are a vital component of SEO (search engine optimization), as links back to my website from highly ranked, popular websites, which contributes to my achieving page one search results for my own website when appropriate keywords are searched on Google. It’s complicated but it works.

I recently was searching for some javascript code I could use to do something clever on my website. When I found what I wanted to adapt, I checked to see what the terms of use were. The writer of the code very humbly asked for a mere $5 if you wanted to remove his name from the invisible credits that would only appear where other code seekers would see it. Otherwise, it was free. How can you not respect a request like that? I happily left his name even though I needed to spend many hours tweaking the code to work in my situation but felt a certain kinship with this skilled individual that engendered the utmost in admiration and obedience. I treat others the way I wish to be treated myself.

It certainly was upsetting when I first realized that my articles were being used improperly and published as if written by someone on the website where I happened to find them. I checked the usage policies of the article websites to which I had submitted my articles which stated that it was required that articles be published with a signature line (meaning, author’s name) along with a link to the author’s website.

After reading that, I thought, “Oh, great! Maybe they will help me enforce their policies.” But after further reading I quickly learned that it was my responsibility to do any policework, notifying offenders of what they so innocently had overlooked. Once such violations are brought to light, these well-meaning publishers will be eager to correct their ways. Ha! That’s a laugh!

Not only do these offending websites have no way to contact anyone, they are enshrouded in secrecy by unknown hosts who ironically invite you to “report abuse,” only to inform you that they cannot accept responsibility for any individual blog publisher’s offenses. If you want to try posting a comment to communicate the violation, you usually need to register and log in, divulging all your own personal information, so your comment will ultimately get picked up by Google associated with a less-than-reputable website in some future search that will follow you to your grave. (Is this where we’re headed, as members of this Google-dominated culture we live in?)

As I was searching the title of my article which is how I discovered the stolen usages, I saw something else which made me realize what a tangled web we weave on the Internet. One instance of my article used my title verbatim, but what followed in the body of the article was what appeared to be an error-ridden, broken-English, horrendous translation from some other language, which suggested that this article had gone full circle. I imagined someone publishing my English-language article in say, Chinese, for example, and someone translating it back into English to use it on the website where I found it. Let’s just say I wasn’t a bit unhappy about the lack of attribution in this situation!

But this is sad… a very sad state of affairs, wouldn’t you agree? Or isn’t it, rather, “Wake up and smell the coffee! This is reality, so get over it”? Hence, my resignation. As a person with wavering self-esteem to begin with, I accept having someone pirate my work to call his own in the same way I accept someone cutting me off in traffic, or cutting ahead of me in line at the grocery store. It’s gotten to be so commonplace that what else can you do but just shrug your shoulders about it? Sure, you could make a scene but ironically in today’s society, you would be running the risk of getting arrested for breach of peace and instigating a public disturbance. That would be a perfect example of today’s justice. No thanks. I’d rather just look the other way and be glad that they’re not hauling me off as the real criminal for publishing interesting articles that tempt others to steal them.

But… just a minute! Isn’t that a website that has actually included my name as the author? And included a link to my picture and website as well? Well, now. Isn’t that nice of someone, to be so kind! Funny how abiding by the rules we’re all supposed to be following is the new supernatural, worthy of reverence usually reserved for the divine or the immortal.

Are we so jaded that merely obeying the law of the land has been elevated to an act of sainthood, and deserving of the grand prize awarded only to superhumans? I guess it follows then that telling the truth, showing respect, offering help and being fair are also beyond expectation for normal individuals, and anyone exhibiting such behavior should be honored with recognition as one of today’s superheroes. Never mind that many religions teach “Thou shalt not steal”; in fact, raised as a Catholic, I was taught not to even “covet” my neighbor’s goods, let alone go so far as to steal them. It was wrong to even “lust” after them, to use a term made famous (or would it be “infamous”?) by Jimmy Carter in a Playboy interview back in 1976. And certainly in civil law, everyone knows it is a punishable offense to take something that doesn’t belong to you. But this is more than that. It is not only taking it, but gaining glory from it as well! And in some instances, it is even gaining revenue from it because of advertising that appears as a result of its saleability and magnetic appeal, drawing cybertraffic to fulfill promised ad viewership. That should fall under a more grievous category and worthy of an even bigger punishment.

And if I were inclined to contact a copyright lawyer, I would be advised of my many rights in such a case. I would also be informed that I would be responsible for payment to the lawyer to represent me whether he was successful in apprehending the guilty party or not. Another case of divine justice gone bad. My rights are violated and I pay as a result. No pain, no gain, right? The pain being my shock and awe at having been so flagrantly ripped off; my outrage at having someone else impersonate me as the author; and my disgust at needing to pay a lawyer to defend my rights. The gain? Obviously all in the thief’s court, so to speak.

Career Opportunities in Criminal Justice

Thinking about a career in criminal justice? Perhaps you’d like to patrol the streets and arrest suspects, investigate crimes using high technology, or even help convicted offenders to rebuild their lives. In the United States there are a wide variety of criminal justice careers to choose from:

o Private detectives and investigators assist individuals, businesses, and attorneys by collecting and analyzing information.

o Probation officers-in some states called community supervision officers-supervise people who have been placed on probation.

o Correctional treatment specialists-also known as case managers-counsel offenders and create rehabilitation plans for them when they return to regular life.

o Parole officers supervise offenders who have been released from prison on parole.

o Pretrial services officers conduct pretrial investigations, which help determine whether persons who have been arrested should be released before their trial.

o Uniformed police officers have general law enforcement duties.

o Sheriffs and deputy sheriffs are county law enforcement officers.

o State police officers-also called state troopers or highway patrol officers-work for a state government and patrol highways to enforce motor vehicle laws and regulations.

o Detectives are investigators who gather information and evidence for criminal cases.

o Fish and game wardens enforce state and local hunting, fishing, and boating laws.

o Federal law enforcement opportunities include the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Air Marshals, and many others.

o Many Federal agencies employ police and special agents, including the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Law Enforcement, the U.S. Postal Service, the Forest Service, and the National Park Service.

o Many Federal agencies employ police and special agents, including the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Law Enforcement, the U.S. Postal Service, the Forest Service, and the National Park Service.

What are your prospects? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts steady job growth for many law enforcement careers through the next decade. Career prospects may vary according to the exact profession. Opportunities in local police departments, for example, are predicted to be excellent for individuals who meet personal, psychological, and physical qualifications. Opportunities are also expected to be excellent for qualified computer forensic investigators.

Wages and benefits for criminal justice graduates can be impressive. For example, in the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report of May, 2006, police and sheriff’s patrol officers had median annual earnings of $47,460. Median annual earnings of detectives and criminal investigators were $58,260, while median annual earnings of police and detective supervisors were $69,310. Not too shabby!

Criminal justice degree training can help. People who want to enter the field of criminal justice can often begin their careers after earning associate degrees or certifications from dedicated criminal justice schools. The more you study, the further you might go. Criminal justice degrees, both bachelors and masters, are offered through many online and on-campus schools throughout the country. There are also federal and state safety training centers that offer ongoing courses to working professionals in counterterrorism, self-defense, and crowd control.

Many graduates of criminal justice degree programs find work as private security consultants for banking institutions, manufacturing and high-tech companies, and government agencies. With additional training they may go on to other careers, attending law school and becoming public defenders or prosecutors.

How do you get started?

The best way to research your options is to go online to a free college directory website like the one below. You can enter the search terms that are appropriate for you (such as “criminal justice, Miami, Florida,” or “online court reporter degrees”). You’ll be presented with free information about the programs that meet your criteria. Compare features such as financial aid, career services, and flexible schedules. Narrow down your choices and make your application. In less time than you think you could be training for a rewarding new career.

Warez and the Crack Factor of Internet Piracy – Can Piracy Law Stop Crack Addiction?

Warez often originates from hackers that crack a code for the thrill of the challenge. But “crackers,” those in the hacker world who crack and profit from software piracy, have capitalized on the efforts of hackers and their cracked codes – successfully building a billion dollar international underground economy. This underground community of “cracker” pirates thrives on international software and Internet piracy.

Litigators, copyright holders, and media giants are working together with law enforcement agencies to beat down the doors of the pirates’ virtual underground warehouses. New copyright laws and international piracy treaties are on the table at nations across the world, awaiting rewritten code to revitalize current piracy laws and keep up with the swift currents of Internet technology. FBI operations go undercover by names such as the 2001 Operation Buccaneer, Operation Bandwidth, and Digital Piratez, and the more recent Operation Site Down, Operation Copycat, Operation Jolly Roger and Operation Fast Link. Warez Operation Buccaneer resulted in 58 search warrants worldwide – which was the “largest” crackdown of 2001. Operation Bandwidth corralled the pirates by setting up a fake warez software piracy website. The Digital Piratez operation resulted in only 9 warrants. This was just the beginning of the Warez crackdown and the FBI’s foray into the world of crack addiction.

The warez pirates continue to circumvent the piracy laws that are on the verge of crumbling down their underground economy. As they continue their overseas pirating escapades – so to does the FBI continue their undercover operations. A 2008 United States Department of Justice report summarizes the statistics of the warez operations Sitedown and Fastlink – which resulted in 108 felony convictions, confiscation of over one-hundred million dollars worth of pirated software, and 200 search warrants that traveled to over 15 countries. Far more than the 58 search warrants that served the pirates of 2001. In 2007, there were 217 intellectual property cases filed. Letters from hackers under investigation litter the Internet – warning their co-conspirators to “get out” before it’s too late.

The FBI wasn’t alone in the warez crackdown operations. Fifteen countries assisted the US in their search for warez piracy. Suppliers who supply the hardware to a warez website, Scripters who help build a website, Brokers who develop active groups, and Encoders who overwrite the copyright protection, have all been held liable in federal court. Charges included not only copyright infringement, but also conspiracy to commit copyright infringement, circumventing copyright infringement and trafficking illegal goods.

Piracy law will continue to gain attention by law enforcement agencies and warez pirates. The US House unanimously approved the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act which allows for current federal law to be rewritten for liberal seizure procedures and the creation of a position for a presidentially appointed U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement Representative. It also creates a new division in the Department of Justice for intellectual property enforcement and ten positions within embassies. Internet piracy is being tracked daily by the feds. But the heat won’t be putting out the pirates completely anytime soon.

The warez scene is addictive. Hackers live for the challenge of cracking a code – even if there isn’t any financial gain. Warez groupies get a rush from seeing how fast a cracked file can start spreading like wildfire. Pirates that serve international traffickers prey on these addictions – offering slick trades of expensive hardware and digital ware that feeds the warez scene. Piracy laws are building up strength to fight billions of dollars of intellectual property theft and copyright infringement. But they are also fighting an addiction. And addictions can skew perceptions. The hackers and crackers of the warez scene might not see the reality of piracy law until the Feds come knocking at their door. Reality will then strike as hard as the clang of iron bars.

Staying Away From the US Department of Justice Virus

Department of Justice Virus is one of the latest threats from Ukash virus group that try to attack people living in the United States of America. This threat belongs to the category of ransomware, so it is designed to get inside the system secretly and then try to rip users off. Just like other related viruses such as the money pack virus – it creates lots of troubles for its victims by locking the system down. This results is complete system’s take over – user becomes incapable to get on the Internet, launch legitimate anti-malware programs or do other things on his PC. He only sees a forged Department of Justice Virus alert, which states that user is caught doing illegal activities on his computer. Before you fall for this alert, you must note that such organizations as Department of Justice do NOT collect their fines in such way. You must remove Department of Justice Virus immediately!

This scam is designed to use the same ways intrussion as all previous Ukash viruses: it uses spam emails, freeware, shareware and other sources to come inside undetected. Once there, it locks the system down and shows its only message, claiming that Windows system has been blocked because you have been using copyrighted content, visiting pornographic websites or even spreading malware. For that, now you have to make a payment of $200 using the Moneypak prepayment system. Here’s how this message looks like:

Your computer has been locked!

This operating system is locked due to the violation of the federal laws of the United States of America (Article: 1, Section 8, Clause 8; Article 202; Article 2012 of the criminal code of the U.S.A. Provides for the deprivation of liberty for four to twelve years.)

Following violations detected:

Your IP address was used to visit websites containing pornopraphy, child pornography, zoophillia and child abuse. Your computer also contains video files with pornographic content, elements of violence and child pornography!

(… )

You have 72 hours to pay the fine, otherwise you will be arrested.

(… )

No matter how trustworthy it seems, you must ignore this alert because it has nothing to do with Department of Justice. If you pay this $100 or $300 fine, you won’t have your computer unlocked and you will lose your money as well. In order to avid that, you should remove Department of Justice Virus as soon as possible.

HOW TO REMOVE THIS VIRUS

In order to remove Department of Justice virus, you should try following this information. It includes different methids that MAY work in this virus removal. Remember that manual removal methid can be used only if you have enough nowledge about computer’s system and its architecture:

* Users infected with Department of Justice virus are allowed to access other accounts on their Windows systems. If one of such accounts has administrator rights, you should be capable to launch anti-malware program.

* Try to deny the Flash to make your ransomware stop function as intended. In order to disable the Flash, go to Macromedia support and select ‘Deny’:

* Flash drive method:

  1. Take another machine and use it to download Spy Hunter or other reputable anti-malware program.
  2. Update the program and put into the USB drive or simple CD.
  3. In the meanwhile, reboot your infected machine to Safe Mode with command prompt and stick USB drive in it.
  4. Reboot computer infected with Department of Justice virus once more and run a full system scan with updated anti-malware program.

* Manual Department of Justice removal (special skills needed!):

  1. Open Windows Start Menu, enter %appdata% into the search field, click Enter.
  2. Go to: Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup.
  3. Remove ctfmon (don’t mix it with ctfmon.exe!).
  4. Open Windows Start Menu, enter %userprofile% into the search field, click Enter.
  5. Go to Appdata\Local\Temp and remove rool0_pk.exeDelete [random characters].mof file
  6. Delete V.class
  7. Run a full system scan with updated spy hunter program to remove remaining Department of Justice virus files.

UPDATE: There is a new Ukash virus, which uses the logo of the Department of Justice. This threat now says ‘ Your Computer Has Been Blocked’ The work of your computer has been suspended on the grounds of the violation of the law of the United States of America”. Similarly to the previous version of the Department of Justice virus, this ransomware shows a list of laws, that have been violated, and asks to pay the fine of $300 using MoneyPak prepayment system. Besides, it speaks to the victim!